WHO TO CONSIDER FOR VOCABRIA + REKAMBYS?

Patients are interested in less frequent dosing

In multiple ViiV-sponsored and independent surveys, people living with HIV have expressed an interest in less frequent dosing.1–4 It was identified as one of the most important potential improvements in HIV therapy by patients.5

Nearly 55% icon

would prefer not having to take medication every day as long as their HIV stays suppressed5

39% to 73% icon

expressed interest in an injectable HIV treatment dosed less frequently than daily oral treatment2,3

Understanding unmet needs in HIV therapy

Global study highlights the challenges of daily therapy for some people living with HIV

Positive Perspectives Wave 2 survey (PP2) is one of the largest, global, HIV patient-reported outcomes studies to date.*1 2,389 people living with HIV aged 18–84 across 25 countries took part in the study.1

This ViiV-sponsored study reveals the experiences of people living with HIV, reflecting changes in HIV care and provides insights into aspects of quality of life that need to be addressed.1

The results of PP2 showed that for some patients, taking daily medication can affect their emotional wellbeing.1 Patients often don’t share the treatment challenges they face with their physicians.1

FEAR OF DISCLOSURE1
58% icon

hide or disguise their HIV medication

46% icon

experience stress if someone finds their HIV medication

ANXIETY WITH STAYING ADHERENT1
33% icon

say remembering to take daily HIV treatment causes stress or anxiety

A DAILY REMINDER OF HIV1
58% icon

are reminded of HIV in their life when taking tablets

35% icon

are reminded of bad experiences from their past when taking tablets

Need to discuss further?

*This ViiV-sponsored study had ethics approval and input from an advisory committee of physicians and patient representatives.1

References:

  1. de los Rios P, Okoli C, Castellanos E, et al. Physical, emotional, and psychosocial challenges associated with daily dosing of HIV medications and their impact on indicators of quality of life: findings from the Positive Perspectives Study. AIDS Behav. Published online ahead of print: October 7, 2020. doi: 10.1007/s10461-020-03055-1.
  2. Williams J, Sayles HR, Meza JL, et al. Long-acting parenteral nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy: interest and attitudes of HIV-infected patients. Nanomedicine (Lond). 2013;8(11):1807-1813. 
  3. Derrick B, Ostermann J, Weissman SB, et al. Who wants to switch? Gauging patient interest in novel antiretroviral therapies. Open Forum Infect Dis. 2018;5(10):ofy247. 
  4. Swindells S, Andrade-Villanueva JF, Richmond GJ, et al. Long-acting cabotegravir and rilpivirine for maintenance of HIV-1 suppression. N Engl J Med. 2020; 382:1112-1123. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1904398. 
  5. de los Rios P, Okoli C, Young B, et al. Treatment aspirations and attitudes towards innovative medications among people living with HIV in 25 countries. Popul Med. 2020; 2:23. doi: https://doi.org/10.18332/popmed/124781.

Adverse events should be reported. Reporting forms and information can be found at https://yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk/ or search for MHRA Yellowcard in the Google Play or Apple App store. Adverse events should also be reported to GlaxoSmithKline on 0800 221 441.

REKAMBYS (rilpivirine long acting injection), including the trademark is owned by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies and used under license by the ViiV Healthcare group of companies. All other trademarks are owned by the ViiV Healthcare group.

PM-GB-CBR-WCNT-210001v3 I April 2022

Report an adverse event

Adverse events should be reported. Reporting forms and information can be found at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard or search for MHRA Yellowcard in the Google Play or Apple App store. Adverse events should also be reported to GlaxoSmithKline on 0800 221441.

If you are from outside the UK, you can report adverse events to GSK/ViiV by selecting your region and market, here.